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Joshua Turner
Joshua Turner

Undisputed (2002) Hindi Dubbed Movie Review: A Gritty and Entertaining Prison Boxing Drama



Undisputed: A Review of the 2002 Prison Boxing Movie




Undisputed is a 2002 American sports drama film that tells the story of two rival prison boxers who fight for the title of undisputed champion. The film stars Wesley Snipes as Monroe Hutchen, a former professional boxer who has been undefeated in prison for 10 years. It also stars Ving Rhames as George Chambers, a heavyweight champion who is convicted of rape and sent to the same prison as Hutchen. The film is directed by Walter Hill, who co-wrote it with David Giler. It also features Peter Falk as Mendy Ripstein, an old mobster who organizes the fight between Hutchen and Chambers.




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In this article, I will review Undisputed and discuss its production, reception, and legacy. I will argue that Undisputed is a gritty and entertaining sports drama that showcases the skills and charisma of Snipes and Rhames.


The making of Undisputed




Undisputed was the result of Walter Hill's long-time interest in making a boxing film. Hill, who is best known for directing action classics like The Warriors (1979), 48 Hrs. (1982), and Streets of Fire (1984), was a fan of boxing movies since he was a kid. He said, "I always wanted to do a boxing picture. I grew up on them. I saw every one that came along."


Hill got the idea for Undisputed after reading about Mike Tyson's rape conviction and prison sentence in 1992. He wondered what would happen if Tyson had to fight another champion in prison. He said, "I thought, 'That's a movie.' It's a very simple idea. Two guys in prison have to fight. Who's going to win?"


Hill co-wrote the script with David Giler, who had collaborated with him on several films, including the Alien franchise. They decided to make the film as realistic and authentic as possible, avoiding the clichés and melodrama of most boxing movies. Hill said, "We wanted to do a movie that was not about redemption, not about love, not about any of the things that most boxing movies are about. We wanted to do a movie that was just about the fight."


Hill cast Wesley Snipes and Ving Rhames for the lead roles of Monroe Hutchen and George Chambers, respectively. Snipes was already an established star, having appeared in hits like White Men Can't Jump (1992), Demolition Man (1993), and Blade (1998). Rhames was a rising star, having gained recognition for his roles in Pulp Fiction (1994), Mission: Impossible (1996), and Out of Sight (1998). Hill said, "They're both terrific actors and they both look like they can fight."


Snipes and Rhames trained hard for their roles, working out with professional boxers and trainers. Snipes worked out with Emanuel Steward, who had trained champions like Thomas Hearns and Lennox Lewis. Rhames worked out with Michael Bentt, who had been a boxer himself and played Sonny Liston in Ali (2001). Hill said, "They both took it very seriously. They both got in great shape. They both learned how to box."


The film was shot in two different Nevada prisons: High Desert State Prison and Ely State Prison. Hill wanted to use real prisons to create a realistic atmosphere and avoid building sets. He said, "We wanted to shoot in a real prison because we wanted to get the feel of it, the smell of it, the sound of it."


The film also used real prisoners as extras, who were paid $50 a day for their participation. Hill said, "We had about 300 prisoners in the movie. They were all volunteers. They were all very cooperative and very enthusiastic."


The final fight scene between Hutchen and Chambers was shot in a Las Vegas arena, with a crowd of 5,000 people cheering them on. Hill said, "We wanted to make it look like a big event, like a pay-per-view event."


One of the most memorable scenes in the film is the monologue by Peter Falk as Mendy Ripstein, an old mobster who tells the story of how he met Al Capone and witnessed the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Falk improvised most of his dialogue, based on some notes that Hill gave him. Hill said, "Peter is a great actor and a great storyteller. He just made it up as he went along." b70169992d


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